Other Sports

Para-Badminton rules and regulations

Para-Badminton rules and regulations

Para-Badminton-Guide

The Game of Para-Badminton

The origin of badminton can be traced to the game called Battledore and shuttlecock. This game was played by two people, using small badminton rackets, called battledores.

https://badmintonlounge.com/para-badminton-rules-and-regulation/

The object of the game is for players to bat the shuttlecock from one to the other as many times as possible without allowing the shuttlecock fall to the ground.

The game of badminton as we know it today was created in mid-1800s in British India. It was created by British military officers stationed there. Early photos show Englishmen adding a net to the traditional game of battledore and shuttlecock.

Para-Badminton has been competed internationally since the 1990’s, with the first World Championships taking place in Amersfoort, the Netherlands, in 1998. But it was not until 2011 that the sport was brought under the governance of the Badminton World Federation.

Para-Badminton will be an official sport for the first time in the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games with players competing in singles, doubles and mixed doubles events. Recently the Badminton World Federation announced that Para badminton is one of the 22 sports that will be part of the Paris 2024 Paralympic Games.

This guide will cover the rules and regulation of Para-Badminton.

Para-Badminton Classes

There are six Para-Badminton classes. The Para-Badminton wheelchair Class singles. The Para-Badminton wheelchair Class doubles. The Para-Badminton singles standing lower class playing half court. The Para-Badminton singles standing lower class playing full court. The Para-Badminton singles standing upper class. The Para-Badminton singles short stature class.

Para-Badminton Equipment

In the basic Badminton rules, each player gets to have a racket. Instead of a ball, a shuttle or shuttlecock is used, which is easy to identify because of the presence of the feathers on its top part and a half round ball at the bottom part.

In Para-Badminton a wheelchair or a crutch can be used.

Wheelchair rules

  1. A player’s body may be tied to the wheelchair with an elastic belt either around the waist or across the thighs or both.
  2. The player’s feet must be fixed to the footrest of the wheelchair.
  3. The seat of the wheelchair, including any padding can be horizontal or angled backwards. It cannot be angled forwards.
  4. A wheelchair may be equipped with a rear supporting wheel, which may extend beyond the main wheels.
  5. The wheelchair must not have any electric or other devices to assist movement or steering of the chair.

Allowed

Not Allowed

Correct

Image Credits: Isu.edu

Fault

Crutch rules

  1. An upper or lower leg amputee may use a crutch.
  2. The crutch must not exceed the players’ natural measurement from the armpit to the ground.

Badminton Court

In setting up the court, there are three things that you should achieve:

  1. The net should be in the middle, with both sides of the court equal in size.
  2. The net must not slack and is pulled tight.
  3. The net should cover the whole width of the court.

In the Badminton rules the court is rectangle. The court size is 13.4 meters long and 6.1 meters wide. For singles the court is 5.18 meters wide.

In Para-Badminton there are three different court lines for each Para-Badminton class.

Wheelchair singles Class

A wheelchair singles court has four lines:

  1. The front service line (red)
  2. The center line (green)
  3. The back line (the outermost line) (blue)
  4. The doubles sideline (orange)

Wheelchair doubles class

A wheelchair doubles class court has four lines:

  1. The front service line (red)
  2. The doubles left side line (green)
  3. The back line (the outermost line) (blue)
  4. The doubles right side line (orange)

The Para-Badminton singles standing class playing half court.

A Para-Badminton singles standing class playing half court has four lines:

  1. The net line (red)
  2. The center line (green)
  3. The back line (the outermost line) (blue)
  4. The doubles right side line (orange)

Service Court Lines

The smaller box shapes you can see inside the court are called the service courts. There are three different service courts lines, one for each Para-Badminton class. They have a purpose, which we will discuss shortly. For now, let’s visualize these boxes first.

A Wheelchair singles service court has four lines:

  1. The front service line (red)
  2. The center line (green)
  3. The inside back line (blue)
  4. The doubles right side line (orange)

Since the doubles court is wider because they use the outermost lines, the doubles service courts are wider.

A Wheelchair doubles service court has four lines:

  1. The front service line (red)
  2. The doubles left side line (green)
  3. The inside back line (blue)
  4. The doubles right side line (orange)

A Para-Badminton singles standing class playing half court has four service court lines:

  1. The front service line (red)
  2. The center (green)
  3. The back line (the outermost line) (blue)
  4. The singles right side line (orange)

Service Courts

These are the rules for using service courts in singles Para-Badminton classes (Wheelchair singles and Para-Badminton singles standing class playing half court):

  1. The server must be inside his service court.
  2. The server and receiver shall serve from and receive in their respective service courts.

These are the rules for using service courts in doubles Para-Badminton classes (Wheelchair doubles):

  1. The player of the serving side shall serve from the right service court when the server’s score is even or scoreless.
  2. The player of the serving side shall serve from the left service court when the server’s score is odd.
  3. The server must be inside his service court.
  4. The receiver on the opposite service court must be in a diagonal direction of the server.
  5. The player of the receiving side who served last shall stay in the same service court from when he last served.
  6. The players shall not change their respective service sides until they win a point when their side is serving.
3d badminton Court-scoring

Serving

To start the rally, a player must serve or hit the shuttle first. There are special badminton rules for serving in order to prevent the server from getting the advantage. These rules are only applicable to serving and are immediately non-usable once the main game starts.

These are the Para-Badminton service rules:

  1. The shuttlecock must be hit so that it goes in an upwards direction.
  2. In Wheelchair Badminton, the whole shuttle shall be below the server’s armpit at the instant of being hit by the server’s racket. Anything higher than that is not allowed.
  3. In Wheelchair Badminton: from the start of the service and until the service is delivered, the wheels of the server and the receiver must be stationary, except the natural counter movement of the server’s wheelchair.

Scoring and Winning

You get a point if the shuttle you hit lands in your opponent’s court before he hits it. You can also gain a point if the shuttle goes outside the court or if it hits the net. You can also gain a point if your opponent commits a fault.

The first player to reach 21 points wins the game, but if the score reaches 20-20, you’ll need a two-point lead to win. If you reach 30-29, however, you’ve won the game, since 30 points is the upper limit. This rule was created in order to prevent the games from dragging on too long. To win the game overall, you’ll have to win two games out of three.

The side winning a game serves first in the next game.

Para-Badminton Fault

As mentioned above a player gets a point if the opponent commits a fault. What is a fault in Badminton? There are 6 different faults in badminton.

Contact Fault

A Contact Fault occurswhen, in the middle of the rally, you touch the net with your racket or you hitthe shuttle with anything besides your racket. That includes your shoes, pants,leg, etc. it is still regarded as a fault.

Over the net Fault

An Over the net Fault occurs when, in the middle of the rally, your racket is over the net and hits the shuttle in your opponents’ side of the court. It is not considered a fault if your racket hits the shuttle in your side of the court even if the follow through from the hit your racket is over the net in your opponents’ side of the court.

To make it simple aslong you hit the shuttle in your side of the court, your racket can go over thenet.

Service Fault

The most common Service Fault occurs when a player tries to perform a short serve. The reason this is very common is because players will try very hard to make the shuttle go just barely over the net. This is a very difficult serve for beginners.

Another way a player commits a Service Fault is if the player serves not according to the official Badminton rules.

According to the official rules the server must comply with these three rules while serving.

  1. The server must hit the whole shuttle below 1.15 meters from the surface of the court at the instant of being hit by the racket.
  2. The servers’ racket head must be pointing downwards when hitting the shuttle.
  3. The racket must swing in an upward direction.

If the server does notserve according to these three rules the receiver gets a point even if theshuttle lands in the receivers service court.

Receivers Fault

The receiver cannot move his feet until the server hits the shuttle with the racket.

Double Hit

When the shuttle comes to a player’s side the player has only one attempt to hit the shuttle to the opponents’ side. If the player hits the shuttle twice, the opponent wins the rally and gains a point.

Wheelchair Fault

In Wheelchair Badminton a fault shall be called:

  1. If the moment the shuttle is hit no part of the players’ bottom or legs is in contact with the seat of the wheelchair.
  2. If the fixation of a foot to the footrest is lost.
  3. During play, the player touches the floor with any part of the feet.

This guide does not cover the Para-Badminton singles standing lower class playing full court, the Para-Badminton singles standing upper class playing full court and the Para-Badminton singles short stature class. These classes play full court. For the Badminton rules for these classes check out The Badminton Rules and Regulations.

Also see this video made by the BWF on the “Indtroduction to Para-Badminton”.

For more resources see these sites:

Cynthia Mathez

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Close